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While in the USVI one of our favorite pastimes is catching lobsters, otherwise known as Lobstering. Thanks to amazing friends Peter and Eben we have learned a few tricks of the trade and can be marginally successful on our own.

We pulled into Maho Bay (of last year’s Lobsterfest fame) and a party/plan came together pretty quickly. There were FIVE boats of young cruisers in the bay and we hatched a plan over dinner to lobster the next morning.

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In case you want to check out the knuckleheads we have been hanging out with lately:

Yacht Ruby Rose. If you stalk our FB or Insta lately you will see they are consistently a source of fun and entertainment. The perfect partners in crime.

Wanderlust. We have been internet friends for ages but finally just met in real life last week. Even more awesome in person than on the internet – if that is even possible!

Allende.  New friends Krisiann and Graham run a charter on their GORGEOUS catamaran. If you are looking for a caribbean vacation i can’t recommend them enough. Incredible food, fabulous boat and lovely people!

Obviously the best part of lobstering is eating the actual lobster – but the thrill of the hunt is equally exhilarating – maybe even better. We held a planning meeting (aka war council) amid the dinghys and worked out a strategy. Bo was most familiar with the aquatic area and the only one present that had actually caught a lobster, so naturally he was the General.

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The basics of lobstering are this:

  1. Lots of swimming and looking. A successful hunt requires patience while you swim from rock to rock diving down to peer under the rocks for beedy little lobster eyes. This can take some time and tenacity. The waves and current are typically working against you.
  2. Once you have managed to spot the creature it becomes a game of cat and mouse to extract him from his hole. Most of the time, lobster are not just wandering the sea floor asking to be eaten. They hide themselves in holes and hope you can’t stay under water long enough to extract them. (We did catch one just on a walkabout in about 4 feet of water – unusual!)
  3. The Extracting step can take a while. All members of the hunt gather at the surface and take turns with nets, snares, tickle sticks, etc…to try and remove the lobby from his cozy home. As you can imagine he is less than thrilled about the intrusion and tries to evade them.
  4. Victory!  After some minutes (usually between 5 and 30) the team either moves on to find another lobster or they manage to grab him up and deposit him in the dinghy!! (I should mention that my (allison) role in this whole scenario is typically dinghy driver. I consider it an essential position in the army and consider myself a lobster-er, even if I am rarely involved in ever touching or capturing the lobster. Gross.)
War Council before heading out.

War Council before heading out.

Everybody in the water!

Everybody in the water!

Dinghy drivers are essential to the operations. They also serve as look-outs for boats that may get too close. Here Kristiann, Terysa and Friday (the dog) keep a close lookout.

Dinghy drivers are essential to the operations. They also serve as look-outs for boats that may get too close. Here Kristiann, Terysa and Friday (the dog) keep a close lookout.

This week we captured five lobsters in four days and decided we needed a break from lobster. Excitement level was extremely high and enjoyment level of said lobster was equally high. Lobster lunch, complete with a nice bottle of Rose, was prepared by Nick and then we all took a nap. Lobstering is hard work!

Victory!

Victory!

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